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A Neighborhood Is Not Safe

Author: Janet Peter
by Janet Peter
Posted: Apr 03, 2019
term neighborhood

Introduction

The term neighborhood has numerous meanings and uses according to different people, environment, and context (Kawachi et al. 2003). For instance, neighborhood may refer to a small group of houses in the immediate vicinity of one's home or a larger area covered by a number of houses of similar structure and market values. A deeper look at the contextual meaning of the neighborhood shows that it relates both to social (people-oriented) and geographic. In other words, the term neighborhood refers to the people who live near each other and occupy a section of an area in town or city (Kawachi et al. 2003). According to former studies and research about, it’s of strong evidence that many of these neighborhoods are not safe to live. That insecurity entails the hygiene, security and immorality conducted within their bounds. One would notice that a bigger hand of danger of these places rests on them. Inhabitants of the neighborhoods are themselves sources of risk. This paper looks deeper into safety breaches of neighborhoods.

Background information

Cases of community violence have been the talk of the day in many neighborhoods. That renders many families to experience regular chronic worries and stress. Most of the crimes involve immoral acts such as burglary sexual harassment, bullet shots, as well as to social disorder issues like the trafficking and sale of graffiti, development of teen gangs and drugs abuse. Such activities are said to be so epic and have developed to be daily routines in several neighborhoods (Bursik, 2007).

The unsafe nature of neighborhoods

It is of great concern that children begin to witness events of a crime while very. They get to view acts of violence such as the use of guns such as robbery at home. Some got to see murder through stubbing. These actions teach them no morals, but only brutality. A good number of them could turn into bullies (Bursik, 2007). Furthermore, some neighborhoods are much squeezed. Amenities such as playgrounds or community centers are not available. The shortages deny children the opportunities to be proactive and hamper their opportunity to get engaged in the broader community. Poor conditions such as dilapidated housing and litter at door-steps always cause series of impacts that may be harmful to health of residents and their overall well-being. Playgrounds for children are mostly unavailable. However, in places where they exist, they sometimes turn out to become a dangerous spots and hideouts for bad planners (Rubinowitz, 2009).

Not all neighborhoods are unsafe. Some residents have been able to make collaborative measures towards making their communities healthy places to live. One method they have found to be effective is through neighborhood watch programs. Diligently, neighbors have effectively succeeded to prevent violence and crime within their vicinity.

Conclusion

It’s evident that the unsafe nature of a neighborhood cannot only be seen in the angle of crime, but also on the basis of hygiene. In most cases, crime activities involve theft and fights. Lack of space, dirty, littered areas are other issues related to neighborhoods. There are too many instances of violence and ever-present threats, gun sounds, and drug dealings. Residents of such zones are always in worry about what is coming next (Rubinowitz, 2009). Some families spend nights worrying about themselves. All these collectively prove that indeed there exist security issues in these areas. Though unsafe, they form home to many people who have little or no alternative places of abode. All they can do to survive is awaiting the next episode. Many of these neighborhoods are thus unfit to the morality and value incorporation to young growing children, particularly boys.

References

Bursik, R., & Grasmick, H. G. (2011). Neighborhoods in crime: The dimensions of effective community control: Lanham Books

Kawachi, I., Berkman, L. F., & NetLibrary, Inc. (2013). Neighborhoods and health Oxford: Oxford University Press

Rubinowitz, & Rosenbaum (2009). Crossing the group and color lines: From public housing to white suburbia. Chicago: University of Chicago Press

Carolyn Morgan is the author of this paper. A senior editor at MeldaResearch.Com in Write My Research Paper For Me services. If you need a similar paper you can place your order from custom nursing essay writing services.

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