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Leading Contemporary Artist- Ramona Sakiestewa

Author: Alex Cox
by Alex Cox
Posted: May 01, 2021

At the time, I didn't know that I would one day develop ancient village weaving techniques, launch a household goods brand, and help design the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indians in Washington, D.C. Sachestua took each of these projects steps by step. He passed. her while she reinvents the weaving medium.

Sacisto grew up around Albuquerque, New Mexico, and inherited her father's Hopi culture and traditions from her. She worked in an original shopping center during her teens, which led her to the textile and weaving arts.

Sakistua made her way to New York when she was in her early twenties to live a life in Manhattan. She kept her salary to go on adventures around town, take classes at the School of Visual Arts, and visit the Metropolitan Museum of Art on weekends.

It was a difficult time being a Native American artist. Art curators viewed the techniques of prehistoric peoples that Sacisto herself had taught them as "crafts" rather than "art." Sakiestewa reported that museum leaders distanced them from contemporary art spaces and directed them to museums of ethnographic and natural history.

Ramona Sacistua started making art when she was 4 years old, sewing clothes for her dolls. At seven, she made her own clothes to go to school. Sacisto grew up in and around Albuquerque, New Mexico, and inherited her father's Hopi culture and traditions from her.

It was a difficult time being a Native American artist. Art curators viewed the techniques of prehistoric peoples that Sacisto herself had taught them as "crafts" rather than "art." Sakiestewa reported that museum leaders distanced them from contemporary art spaces and directed them to museums of ethnographic and natural history. The only time people get tapestry samples and it's important is when someone assigns a workshop in Europe to weave a Picasso or Matisse.

Around this time, I produced my two available textiles at the next Hindman Auction. The first piece, titled Blue Corn 10, features a dark blue field with square and rectangular designs.

Opportunities arose everywhere for the artist during the 1990s. After receiving an invitation, she created more than a dozen tapestries based on architect Frank Lloyd Wright's drawings for his foundation.

Sakistua sells her work primarily in galleries and through her business. However, some of her textiles have appeared at auction in recent years. Bonhams offered several fabrics from Sakiestewa in 2020, auctioning them for an average of $ 3,000 each.

In addition to her artwork, Ramona Sakiestewa advises on design projects, sits on museum boards, and sits on national art policy committees. The loom artist retired in 2009 in favor of paper and print work, and she felt that she had already created the best-woven artwork of her own.

This put her on the path of architecture and caught the eye of a designer from Washington, D.C. He approached Sakistowa and offered him partial creative control over the design of the National Museum of the American Indian.

Ramona Sakiestewa

About the Author

Alex cox is a professional writer and market researcher.

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Author: Alex Cox

Alex Cox

Member since: Mar 05, 2021
Published articles: 9

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